Updated December 7, 2021

The Pitt CoVax Vaccination Center

PopUP to the Petersen Events Center for your booster!

To meet the growing demand for COVID-19 boosters, the Pitt CoVax Vaccination Center will be hosting two PopUP events for Pitt students, faculty and staff at the Petersen Events Center:

  • Thursday, December 16, 2021, from 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, January 12, 2022, from 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

Moderna and Pfizer boosters, first doses and flu shots will be available by appointment only. Register here today!

 

Appointments at the Pitt CoVax Vaccination Center are fully booked through the end of December, 2021. We will be closed for the winter break, reopening Jan. 4, 2022. January hours will be posted soon.

Walk-ins are accepted for all COVID-19 vaccines and flu shots, subject to availability, but it’s always best to make an appointment. Due to overwhelming demands, please plan for considerable wait times. Unlike this time last year, vaccines are everywhere and widely available at local pharmacies, physician offices, and mass vaccination sites like UPMC South Side. Check out Allegheny County Health Department’s vaccine provider map for resources and locations, call your local pharmacy or health care provider for guidance, or visit UPMC's COVD-19 vaccine scheduling system.

Hours effective through December 17, 2021:

Mondays, noon – 6:30 p.m.

Tuesdays, noon – 5 p.m.

Wednesdays, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Thursdays, noon – 6:30 p.m.

Fridays, noon – 4 p.m.

Location

  • 4041 Fifth Avenue, at the base of Nordenberg Hall.
  • Easily accessible by Port Authority bus.
  • Free parking for clinic visitors is in Soldiers & Sailors garage. Enter from Bigelow Boulevard.

 

Register for an Appointment
(Read step-by-step instructions)

Offering all three COVID-19 vaccines and flu vaccines

  • Pfizer for those 5 and older (2 doses, given 3 weeks apart), and booster/third doses available.
  • Moderna for those 18 and older (2 doses, given 4 weeks apart), and booster/third doses available.
    • Second dose appointments for Pfizer and Moderna can be scheduled before you leave the clinic.
  • Johnson & Johnson for those 18 and older (single dose), and booster/second doses available.
  • Flu vaccine appointments for Pitt faculty, staff and families can be made online.

  • Student flu shot appointments for November are by appointment only. Visit the Student Health Service flu clinics page for hours.

Booster shots

Updated December 2, 2021

The Pitt CoVax Vaccination Center is offering booster shots in accordance with CDC guidance. In response to the omicron variant, the CDC is recommending that everyone age 18 and older who is eligible get a booster dose of vaccine. Refer to the CDC’s updated booster page for more information. If you have questions about eligibility, please do not hesitate to stop by the center, call or email at 412-383-4372 or covaxcenter@pitt.edu. We are happy to work clinically with individuals to address their concerns. 

The most important thing to remember?

Be reassured by the protection you already have. The delta variant remains the dominant strain in the U.S. right now, and the current vaccines remain highly effective against delta. If you were vaccinated, even six months ago or more, you are still extremely protected against severe disease from COVID-19. Vaccination remains the best way to protect yourself, reduce the spread of the virus and help prevent new variants from emerging.

Walk-ins are welcome, subject to availability! Please plan for considerable wait times due to overwhelming demands.

Frequently Asked Questions: Vaccines

Who needs protection?

Everyone needs protection. 

Some people are naturally less likely to experience complications if they get sick with the virus that causes COVID-19. Some people will get the virus and never develop any symptoms. Other people are not as lucky. Some have compromised immune systems and are not able to develop a strong protective immune response. Immune systems are highly complicated. But it means that higher-risk people must rely on the rest of us to get vaccinated to protect them from getting seriously ill with the virus. This reliance on others is called herd immunity. When a higher percentage of the people in a population are protected, the more protection they offer to the small number of people whose bodies are not able to mount an effective immune response on their own.

Aren’t COVID-19 vaccines experimental?

No, none of the COVID-19 vaccines are “experimental.” These vaccines are evidence-based. They have been given to many millions of people. We have seen how safe and effective they are. They have undergone the same rigorous testing as every other vaccine that people get, like the flu vaccine. The FDA authorized the Pfizer, Moderna and J&J vaccines for “emergency use” because the COVID-19 pandemic caused a global public health emergency. Full approvals for COVID-19 vaccines are not being rushed.

What about variants?

As time passes, the virus that causes COVID-19 changes in small ways to evade the protections people have developed against it. This is how viruses survive. When more of us are vaccinated, the virus has less opportunity to mutate into new variants that could infect new people or re-infect recovered COVID-19 patients.

Even if you had COVID-19 before, it is important to get vaccinated. The version of the virus you may have survived months ago may not be the same version of the virus that is currently circulating and infecting people.

We also do not know yet how long immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 lasts. That means, if you had COVID-19 months ago, and are relying solely on your body’s immune response from back then to fight off new variants of the virus, you are not as protected as you could be right now. The vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe disease and hospitalization, even from these new variants.

No matter how it feels, COVID-19 is not over. This virus is constantly changing. We need to use every tool available to shut down the pandemic—and vaccines are the strongest tools we have.

I’ve had COVID-19 and tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. Isn’t that sufficient protection?  

Vaccination provides a more predictable response and demonstrable efficacy against the delta variant.  The antibody tests are not designed to assess if patients are protected against COVID-19, but rather the presence of some antibodies. Those who have had COVID-19 still need to be vaccinated. 

Can I provide proof of COVID-19 immunity from an antibody test rather than proof of vaccination?

No, even if you had COVID-19 before, it is important to get vaccinated. The version of the virus you may have survived months ago may not be the same version of the virus that is currently circulating and infecting people.

We also do not know yet how long immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 lasts. That means, if you had COVID-19 months ago, and are relying solely on your body’s immune response from back then to fight off new variants of the virus, you are not as protected as you could be right now. The vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe disease and hospitalization, even from these new variants.  Learn why the CDC recommends a vaccine for people who had COVID-19.

I’m vaccinated, but my antibody test did not show proof of antibodies. Should I worry?

Vaccinated individuals could have a negative COVID-19 antibody test, and still be protected because the vaccines build antibodies against the spike proteins that may not be detected by the test.

What are the vaccine requirements for international Pitt students?

International students may have already been vaccinated outside of the U.S. If you are a student who received the full dose of a vaccine approved by the World Health Organization while abroad and are planning to be on a Pitt campus this fall, you are considered fully vaccinated and you are encouraged to disclose your vaccination status and details to Pitt.

If you are partially vaccinated before you arrive on campus, you are able to get one of the three vaccines currently available in the U.S.—Pfizer, Moderna or J&J. The same is true for any student, faculty or staff member who has already received full or partial doses of a vaccine not approved by the World Health Organization.

International students with questions should contact the Office of International Services.

Additional Resources

Read the Pfizer fact sheet

Read the Moderna fact sheet

Read the J&J fact sheet

CDC Vaccine Information

Interim Guidelines for COVID-19 Antibody Testing

Antibody Testing is Not Currently Recommended to Assess Immunity After COVID-19 Vaccination: FDA Safety Communication

EUQ Authorized Serology Test Performance